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The Truth of Imagination

Welcome to a page dedicated to poetry from the past 200 years and to poet John Keats. Snippets of information on poetic lives, quotes and art to reflect the role of verse in our fast paced 21st century world. Suzie Grogan is a freelance writer and researcher who writes on literature, social history and health issues. Contact Suzie @keatsbabe on Twitter and visit her at www.nowrigglingoutofwriting.wordpress.com

Posts tagged John Keats

Jun 3 '12
Apr 23 '12

The best reading of John Keats’ wonderful Ode to a Nightingale so far, in my humble opinion of course. Ben Wishaw reads it without the public or drama school accent that would be so unlike Keats’ own.

This poem has inspired so many poets and writers in the past 190 odd years. To my shame I only found out recently that F. Scott Fitzgerald took the title ‘Tender is the Night’ from stanza 4.

Apr 16 '12
Apr 15 '12
Manuscript - ‘To Autumn’ by John Keats (1819)

Manuscript - ‘To Autumn’ by John Keats (1819)

Apr 5 '12

Song - I had a dove… by John Keats

The first four lines of this ‘song’ by Keats are so very clever as a metaphor for possessive love..

I HAD a dove and the sweet dove died; 
And I have thought it died of grieving: 
O, what could it grieve for? Its feet were tied, 
With a silken thread of my own hand’s weaving; 
Sweet little red feet! why should you die - 
Why should you leave me, sweet bird! why? 
You liv’d alone in the forest-tree, 
Why, pretty thing! would you not live with me? 
I kiss’d you oft and gave you white peas; 
Why not live sweetly, as in the green trees? 

Published in Posthumous & Fugitive Poems

Feb 24 '12
Feb 17 '12

The Keats Brothers - the life of John & George by Denise Gigante

I have posted a review of this very interesting, well researched and accessible biography linking the life of the poet John Keats with the experience of his brother George in Kentucky as one of the early English settlers in America.

It is of interest to lovers of poetry, biography an history - most particularly that of Kentucky and Illinois. You will meet swindlers, enjoy bear grease sandwiches and learn that John Keats’s greatest poetry was directly influenced by the physical distance between the brothers.

Go to by blog No wriggling out of writing for the full review.

Jan 22 '12
Jan 21 '12
Jan 19 '12
Jan 13 '12
Jan 8 '12
Jan 3 '12
Dec 20 '11
Bronze statue of John Keats by sculptor Stuart Williamson, located in an alcove from the old London Bridge which sits in the grounds of Guy’s Hospital where the poet undertook his medical training.. 

Bronze statue of John Keats by sculptor Stuart Williamson, located in an alcove from the old London Bridge which sits in the grounds of Guy’s Hospital where the poet undertook his medical training.

Dec 16 '11
On our return from this circuit, we ordered dinner, and set forth about a mile and a half on the Penrith road, to see the Druid temple. We had a fag up hill, rather too near dinner-time, which was rendered void by the gratification of seeing those aged stones on a gentle rise in the midst of the Mountains, which at that time darkened all around, except at the fresh opening of the Vale of St. John.
John Keats 1818. Walking in the Lake District with Charles Brown and visiting the Castlerigg Stone Circle. 
Photo crediy: Żaneta Miderska

On our return from this circuit, we ordered dinner, and set forth about a mile and a half on the Penrith road, to see the Druid temple. We had a fag up hill, rather too near dinner-time, which was rendered void by the gratification of seeing those aged stones on a gentle rise in the midst of the Mountains, which at that time darkened all around, except at the fresh opening of the Vale of St. John.

John Keats 1818. Walking in the Lake District with Charles Brown and visiting the Castlerigg Stone Circle. 

Photo crediy: Żaneta Miderska